Guard Your Health With Apple Watch 3

Posted: Nov 28 in Lifestyle by

We hear stories of young athletes collapsing on the game field. Men and women experience cardiac events while on the job. Sometimes the signs of heart attack are subtle and not immediately recognized by the victim. Can a watch make you more aware of your health, and can it potentially save lives? The new Apple Watch 3 has features that are making serious changes in the way people can monitor their health.

 

Health Condition Alerts

 

Already tracking the wearer’s physical activity, Apple watches keep folks aware of how many steps are taken in a day and alert people when they need to get up and move. Now, the wearer can be alerted to health conditions that need medical attention. Atrial fibrillation, sleep apnea, hyperthyroidism, hypertension, and diabetes can be discovered when the data collected by the Apple watch is fed into DeepHeart, which is Cardiogram’s learning network. Cardiogram is the middleman between the wearer and the watch. It processes the information collected by your phone and can help your physician diagnose serious health and heart issues.

 

Joining Hands

 

The potential medical uses of Apple Watch’s future releases may completely change the way we undergo cardiovascular and other medical testing. Technology and medicine are joining hands to prevent disease by discovering problems before they become life-threatening. There are stories circulating about how the heart rate sensor in the Apple Watch has already prevented heart attacks and pulmonary embolisms in a number of people. Diabetes detection, potential for glucose testing, and the possibility of detecting non-heart diseases from extrapolated data may someday soon find most Americans wearing a watch that reports health data directly to their doctors.

 

Technology is changing medical diagnosis methods. Are you ready to put on a watch or other device, and talk to your doctor via video chat instead of at the office? It may not be long before much of your health care is performed on your watch.

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